Tisha Campbell on Spike Lee’s Social Experiments Around Colorism

Actress, Tisha Campbell joined SiriusXM Urban View host Mike Muse in studio to discuss working with Spike Lee, and his social experiments around colorism, and how she views it today. The actress also spoke about the importance of setting boundaries to excel in all aspects of life, and shared how she’s changed how she devotes … Continued The post Tisha Campbell on Spike Lee’s Social Experiments Around Colorism appeared first on Atlanta Daily World.

Tisha Campbell on Spike Lee’s Social Experiments Around Colorism

Actress, Tisha Campbell joined SiriusXM Urban View host Mike Muse in studio to discuss working with Spike Lee, and his social experiments around colorism, and how she views it today. The actress also spoke about the importance of setting boundaries to excel in all aspects of life, and shared how she’s changed how she devotes her energy.

Tisha Campbell on Spike Lee’s Social Experiments Around Colorism:

Courtesy: SiriusXM Urban View’s The Mike Muse Show.

 

Host, Mike Muse: Did you guys talk about like the colorism that was existing?

Tisha Campbell: Yeah! Talk about it?!

Host, Mike Muse: Did you guys talk about it off film like when you guys weren’t shooting?

Tisha Campbell: Child, stop. So Spike [Lee] put all the light skinned girls in one hotel…a nicer hotel. He put the dark skinned girls in a motel. Then he put all the boys, not just, you know, both factions. He put all the boys in a light skinned girls hotel. I was always at the motel with everybody else. I hung out with them. But it was to create real method chaos.

Host, Mike Muse: Yes. That was a social experiment unto itself.

Tisha Campbell: Absolutely. To create the true tension and it worked. But I think after that moment of the fight scene, I was like, yeah, method acting cool, but I gotta turn the light off. Like I work, I turn the light on. I don’t work, I turn a light off. I can’t do this. I’m going over to everybody else’s motel and hang out with them because everybody took me in.. I was the youngest. I was the little girl in the screenplay.

Host, Mike Muse: That had to create so much tension on the set.

Tisha Campbell: It did. I didn’t like it because me..and the other lead girl..We were there two weeks before everybody else got there and we ran in the same hotel and when he was moving her, we were crying because we bonded. We were like I don’t understand why he’s doing this to us? We did not get it.

Host, Mike Muse: But you guys captured it so well, so that’s really interesting to learn about that social experiment.

Tisha Campbell: Captured it? It was it. It was real.

Host, Mike Muse: It was for me. And I think the reason I always remember to school days is because colorism was different for me growing up and so my mother is your complexion, my sister is a hue darker than you. I have another sister who was my complexion. My dad is a little bit lighter than me, and then my brother’s darker than me. And so we had this rainbow and so there really wasn’t a distinction. We never talked about light skinned, dark skinned, brown skinned so it never existed in my house…It wasn’t until I got to college where things were noted by color distinction and that was because Michigan recruited a lot of kids from Detroit and so of all the black kids, the majority were there. came from Detroit. And so Detroit being majority a black city, they did a lot of distinctions on color. Light skinned Mike, dark skinned Mike, light skinned Keisha, dark skinned Keisha. And so there was so much color notions around that. And then that’s when I woke up to colorism, I was like, oh my God, these are the school days I’m living in right now.

Tisha Campbell: No it’s true and it’s real. There is a thing of light skinned privilege. It is very real. That people have had to deal with. We are just now celebrating melanin. We are just now coming into understanding how beautiful black truly is, our own people. You know what I mean? I grew up in an era where it was bad and I remember doing plays with my Caucasian counterparts and somebody saying, “oh, Tisha thinks she’s so hot, but just look at the color of her skin.” So I had both. Inside and outside of it. I remember taking concealer and drawing my lips smaller to make my lips not protrude. I was made to feel bad about my skin complexion even outside of the black community. Because I’m in a world..like I’m navigating between two worlds. I’m from Newark, New Jersey and then I go to New York and I’m doing musicals and plays and trying to feed my family and these little girls are making this other little girl feel bad for the way that I look.

Host, Mike Muse: Yeah. For your black features.

Tisha Campbell: For my black features. Now it’s interesting, in my family, the first born lacks melanin, and then we progressively get darker as the kids come along. It’s very interesting. I’m first born so I didn’t get it and then all my brothers get progressively darker. It’s just the same thing in all my cousins, same thing. It’s the funniest thing.

Host, Mike Muse: That’s very interesting in the sense of the world and where beauty standards have been, particularly when it comes to the black women. And so here, you’re in this white space within acting.

Tisha Campbell: And now they’re pumping their lips up to look like mine.

Host, Mike Muse: Can you imagine?

Tisha Campbell: No. I couldn’t have told little Tisha this in a million years.

 

Tisha Campbell Has Changed How She Devotes Her Energy:

 

Tisha Campbell: I was used to living for other people all the time, since I was a little kid. Everything was for everybody else. I’m the ultimate empath, but you talked about energy, feeling energy, but what I used to make the mistake of is feeling like if I felt a negative energy, I would try to change it. You can’t always change other people’s energy. You have to understand discernment and protecting yourself from bad energy.

 

Tisha Campbell on Setting Boundaries to Prevent Burnout:

Tisha Campbell: Not everybody’s gonna be happy with your boundaries. There are a lot of people that don’t like the fact that I may have maybe isolated myself to only a small group of friends now, that I don’t give the way that I used to give of myself. That’s okay. It’s not being selfish. It’s being self-full. It’s making sure that you have boundaries set in place so that you are not overextending yourself to everybody all the damn time. And it’s just incredible. For the first time in my life I’m actually giving to me first because I want to be the ultimate wife, or the ultimate mother, or the ultimate coworker. And I would sacrifice my own energy, self-love, everything, to make other people more comfortable.

The interview airs Saturday at 2 pm ET and will replay Sunday at 2 pm ET on SiriusXM Urban View channel 126.

 

The post Tisha Campbell on Spike Lee’s Social Experiments Around Colorism appeared first on Atlanta Daily World.