Black Codes in Texas

  The Dallas Examiner   In 1866, immediately after the Civil War ended, a series of laws called Black Codes were passed during the 11th Texas Legislature. South Carolina was the first to issues Black [...] The post Black Codes in Texas appeared first on Dallas Examiner.

Black Codes in Texas

 

The Dallas Examiner

 

In 1866, immediately after the Civil War ended, a series of laws called Black Codes were passed during the 11th Texas Legislature. South Carolina was the first to issues Black Codes. Eventually, states throughout the South had enacted their own set of Black Codes.

These laws were created to reaffirm that slaves and Blacks were considered economically and socially inferior to Whites. They were also used to regulate Black labor in the antebellum south, fearing that Freedmen we’re not willing to work unless they were coerced. Therefore, Blacks without jobs were appointed a White guardian and forced to work without pay. It also emphasized the previous code stating that all individuals with 1/8 or more African blood was to be considered a Negro.

According to these laws, Blacks were not allowed to testify against a White person or serve on a jury. They’re also not allowed to vote, join the military or change/start a job without their previous employer’s permission. Other restrictions included a curfew, denied access to public facilities and restriction of aggressive behavior or speech. Also, Blacks could not own firearms.

However, Blacks had a right to own property, be legally married and be represented in court. Blacks could also build and attend schools and churches, which in turn became avenues toward improving their communities.

Though Blacks and White activists fought against these laws, they did not truly end until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s, when African Americans fought for justice and equality. In the 1960s, they were successful in having the laws declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Congress. Today, let’s pass legislation ensuring equal rights for all citizens.

 

Sources: Texas Handbook Online, Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the Constitutional Rights Foundation

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